Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
Photo Eric Tabuchi
L’ESPACE DU VIDE
Christophe Cuzin, Jochen Dehn and Stephen Loye

Exhibition from 18th April until 8th June 2014

First day of the mon­tage: hun­dreds of yards of wooden boards, dozens of dry­wall sheets, litres of indus­trial paint. The title of the exhi­bi­tion is devel­oped, L’espace du vide sug­gests an idea rather opposing this accu­mu­la­tion. We know that the empty is indis­so­ciable with the full, it only exists in rela­tion to the latter. It is nec­es­sary some­times to fill it in, to recog­nise its exis­tence. An inte­gra­tion based on restraint, the empti­ness responding to a fair bal­ance, a fragile har­mony.
The phys­ical, tem­poral or mate­rial invest­ment, even if it is real, must not appear at any single moment to be osten­sible or quan­tifi­able, in the same way that zen gar­dens inspire a feeling of har­mony through a stripped down and min­i­malist design.

L’espace du vide by Christophe Cuzin, Jochen Dehn and Stephen Loye is there­fore far from being inert, even if it only fills the mar­gins, at the edge. There is, in effect, a form of ele­gance and dis­cre­tion used by the first two artists in par­tic­ular which leads them to con­sider above all else the con­text, to adapt to it rather than con­strain it to each pro­ject. They work sys­tem­at­i­cally with what already exists, in this case the archi­tec­ture of the art centre for Christophe Cuzin and the social envi­ron­ment for Jochen Dehn.

Christophe Cuzin is at the same time painter, designer and builder. He guided his inter­ven­tion according to the existing char­ac­ter­is­tics of the place: the height of the ceiling, the overall volume and also the sys­tem­atic pres­ence of gallery walls along the orig­inal walls of the art centre. These gallery walls that, according to the clas­sical exhi­bi­tion arrange­ments, have acted as screens or recep­ta­cles for the works. But Christophe Cuzin does not inter­vene where we should expect him. This is why he decided to work in the gaps and not on the gallery walls them­selves. In the space between the two, which he reveals through cov­ering it in paint, a dif­ferent shade for each sheet of plaster used. A geo­metric com­po­si­tion of bright colours that encom­passes the exhi­bi­tion space. Colours radi­ating far beyond their sur­faces. The margin con­tam­i­nating the centre.

This move­ment con­sisting of high­lighting the obscure, marginalised, neglected areas is also one of the con­stants of the inter­ven­tions pro­posed by Jochen Dehn. The artist, who rarely pro­duces objects, instead cre­ates per­for­mances that put into sit­u­a­tion rea­soning, deduc­tions elab­o­rated from infor­ma­tion that the artist col­lects directly or indi­rectly. Information that is most often insignif­i­cant in the light of a larger nar­ra­tive that he vol­un­tarily evac­u­ates. For the story, from which he draws frag­ments, is of little interest to him in the end, what rather moti­vates him is the way in which the anec­dote, the rumour, fills the void cre­ated by uncer­tainty. Not without humour, Jochen Dehn decon­structs these fic­tional under­ground net­works, using both sci­en­tific and poetic pro­ce­dures. Although, cer­tainly more poetic than sci­en­tific. For Jochen Dehn, inven­tive­ness goes hand in hand with DIY, and the empir­ical dimen­sion it implies.

The absur­dity of these exper­i­ments is rem­i­nis­cent of the des­perate and com­ical world described by Stephen Loye in his videos. A world inhab­ited by beings (inter­preted by the artist) who are help­less in the face of a reality that is drained of its meaning. For the exhi­bi­tion, he pre­sents a film enti­tled Et.

Et as the moving desire to rethink the sur­faces of con­tact, which link us to others and keep us in bal­ance in l’espace du vide that some­times over­whelms us.

Solenn Morel